Confession of an exclamation point-aholic

“Hi. My name is Mary R, and I’m an exclamation point-aholic.”

“Hi, Mary,” droned the group of writers. A few disheveled members fidgeted with their phones. Others stared at me with exhausted, burnt-out eyes. The survivors, further along the road to recovery, nodded and smiled.

“It started out innocently enough,” I told them. “I was writing a children’s story, after all.”

“Ohhh nooo,” groaned the crowd.

“I didn’t even think twice about it. I typed ‘Hey,’ and before that second quotation mark even had a chance—shift, tap—I had hit the exclamation point. That punctuation mark pulsed on the screen, and an electric thrill zinged through me.

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“Two sentences later I typed another. Don’t get me wrong. I did think about it before I … Okay, who am I kidding? It popped up on my screen as if it had a life of its own. The energy, the excitement radiated from that slash-dot. My face flushed, my heartbeat quickened. I gave myself over to the ecstasy of exclamation! I was hooked.

“Before I knew it, I had a page full of exclamation points jumping up and down, dancing, flipping, and doing other unspeakable things—in a children’s story, mind you. Some of them clumped in an angry mob—two, three, yes, four! I admit it: four exclamation points in a row!! Adrenaline surged through my veins. I could hear the excitement in my character’s voice. I could feel his energy. He was alive, I tell you, ALIVE!!!

“Sorry.”

One writer shook her head at me. Most held their heads in their hands. I saw a couple wipe away tears. “We’re here for you, Mary,” said one.

“I’m here because of the children,” I told them. “I had nightmares of children jumping on their beds and bouncing off their walls. And it wasn’t because of the plot or the characters or the conflict. It wasn’t because of well-crafted writing. It was because I let loose a gusher of exclamation points that hit them like a frozen slushie tidal wave, like a stampeding sugar rush. In the corner, an editor writhed in pain as if battling an ice cream brain freeze. I did that to them.”

“It was only a nightmare,” whispered someone.

“But it could happen,” I said. “That’s why I’m here.”

A tortoise in the writing race

So, how’s it going? National Novel Writing Month, that is. This would be the almost halfway point in your quest to hammer out 50,000 words on your novel. If you’re like many writers, that bright, shiny goal might be looking duller by the day.

Go ahead and curse NaNo if you wish. I will not judge you. But don’t stop writing.

Tortiose

I always fancied myself as the tortoise—not the hare—in the writing race. My eyes are fixed on the goal. How fast I get there is not my main concern. Getting there is.

So, if you ruminate over a particular word, or rewrite a scene you labored over last week, or feel compelled to pause to research a detail, that’s okay. The clock may be running out on that NaNo-word-count-thingy, but don’t despair. It’s all about writing anyway.

Whether or not you get those 50,000 words, you are going to wake up December 1st and still write … right? So press on. Write.

NaNoWriMo: Bend the rules

Get on your mark. Get set. Write.

Do you hear it? The clock is ticking, and writers everywhere are tapping out the beginnings of what should be 50,000 words by the end of National Novel Writing Month.

Even if you’re not writing a novel, use NaNo as a motivational exercise to tackle your personal writing goals.

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Fifty-thousand words in the month of November may be an admirable goal for some, but maybe not for you. Maybe you want to get into the habit of writing consistently every day, or Monday through Friday, or maybe that one night of the week you have free. Then put that goal into your Google calendar and do it. Set your alarm on your phone and then write nonstop for an hour, or two, or however long you can. Make it about quality time, not word count.

Yes, people all over the world are madly tapping out words for NaNo, and (Yay!) so are you. But make it about you and your goals.

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