5 ways to reinforce your writing goals

A new month, a new year, a future full of possibilities. Charge full steam ahead with those writing goals, and stay charged with some positive reinforcement.

  1. Connect with other writers.

Surrounding yourself (virtually or otherwise) with like-minded people is a great way to stay focused, motivated and inspired. Google writing groups in your area. Your tribe is waiting! These groups can lead you to critique groups, writing challenges, webinars and classes.

Critique groups and writing challenges not only provide support and encouragement, they motivate you to write with deadlines.

2. Be a follower on social media.

Join Facebook groups of writers or follow writers, agents, editors and publishers on Twitter. I’m not a fan of Twitter because of the political vitriol. I write children’s stories, so angry posts don’t typically inspire thoughts of unicorns and rainbows. However, I’ve gotten pretty good at scrolling past it all.  I also had to unfollow a “writer” who felt compelled to post numerous pictures of popping pimples. I mean, really?

Still, I often find encouragement and motivation on Twitter. It’s also a good way to stay current on the publishing world and discover submission opportunities.

Warning: Don’t let social media be a time suck. Limit your perusing so it doesn’t take away from actual writing time.

3. Read articles and books on craft, but also for inspiration.

Pat yourself on the back every time you do something to improve your craft. Never stop learning. But also, look for uplifting articles. There are plenty of success stories and how-tos and stick-to-it articles to keep you going. Find inspiration in blogs by authors.

4. Write what you want.

What if the market says dinosaur romance is hot, hot, hot? Do you really want to write that? Even if you could force yourself to write about amorous dinosaurs, by the time it’s ready, the market will have changed—hopefully.

Stick to what makes you passionate about writing. That is what makes your writing authentic.

5. Study books in the genre you are writing.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

When I first heard this advice, it was given as a how-to-write tip. Of course! Learn from the authors who write the books you love. But also, take heart from the authors who write books that, well, you don’t love.

Think about all those books that made you go meh. They got published, didn’t they? Why? Because writing, like any art, is subjective. So, when I read a book that makes me go meh, I silently cheer. Your book doesn’t have to appeal to everyone—just enough someones.

The more immersed I am in the writing world, the more motivated I feel, and the more productive I am.

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